We’re the Millers: Inappropriate Humor, All the Laughs

were-the-millers-dvd-cover-49

We’re the Millers is a romantic comedy from 2013 starring Jennifer Aniston and Jason Sudeikis. Sudeikis’ character, David, is a small-time drug dealer in a tight spot after he gets robbed. When David gets voluntold to go fetch some drugs from Mexico he recruits Rose, a stripper; Kenny, a kid living in his apartment complex; and Casey, a couch-surfer to pretend to be his family and help him drive under the radar across the border with the drugs. As you can imagine, the chaos that ensues is ridiculous and more than a little crass, but seeing as that is exactly my type of humor the movie sat well with me.

Certainly, there were some jokes that were a miss, but for the most part it was a direct hit to the funny bone—the plot may have been predictable, but the characters drew you in enough that it didn’t matter. The interpersonal relationships among the characters was both interesting and humorous, adding depth to a movie that could have been a flop otherwise.

I was pleasantly surprised that there was character development all over the place, a likable cast and valuable minor characters. There were many references to how strong the women were and how amazing they were for being that way given their situations before the movie’s plot came by and swept them up in it. This definitely made the movie more likable for me, as there has been a sore lack of strong female characters in any genre in past years. With the recent surge in them, I’m always pleased to find them well-written and well-rounded in surprising genres such as romantic comedies. Props to the writers of this film for not only getting the leading women right, but also writing every other character like they were actual human beings as opposed to 2-dimensional cutouts to fill a role.

The only thing I would warn of is the brand of humor and subject matter. This movie was not suitable to anyone younger than 17; however I do give this movie a rating of 4.5/5 stars, only detracting for the predictable plot.

Advertisements

Tell me what you think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s